Discuss why the “imprisonment binge” is now changing? Identify and discuss an example of a “conservative” alternative to incarceration,

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Some say that the “everybody’s doing it” attitude is the cause for much of the apathy and indifference shown toward white-collar criminal behavior. Others argue that with the ubiquitousness of technology has made it easier to cheat now than in the past. Yet, others advance the perspective that the “differential association” that occurs within the corporate culture is the real culprit for white-collar and professional criminal behavior.

Before responding to the following question, first view this short video on Demand: Public Backlash on Corporate Crime.

1. Is white-collar criminal behavior merely a reflection of all that is wrong with our society, that is – envy, greed, high expectations, strain for success, unequal distribution of wealth…. as we have studied regarding mainstream theories in earlier chapters, or does white-collar criminal behavior actually spring from unique factors, as posited by Sutherland, and other white-collar theorists who challenged mainstream criminological theories? What factors are they?

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When criminological theory seems to be unable to find “what works!” in deterring crime and criminal behavior – it went right back to where is all started – the Classical School. Beginning in the 1980’s, the “tough on crime” policies sprang from what the Classical School and Positivist posited – crime is the result of individual actors’ exercising rational choice or as the result of organic anomalies or psychological defects. Thus, the short answer to the “crime wave” perception was: incapacitation. Consequently, over the past four decades, America experienced an “ imprisonment binge” — resulting in the highest rate of incarceration in the world.

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2. Discuss why the “imprisonment binge” is now changing? Identify and discuss an example of a “conservative” alternative to incarceration, as discussed in Chapter 12, of our text.