Is there ultimately any difference between how the policeman view the barrier between art and life and how Katurian views it?

In The Pillowman, Katurian believes in a firm division between the fictional and the real world. Initially, he is mystified that despite uncanny similarities there could be any relationship between the stories he writes and the child murderers for which Tupolski and Ariel consider him the prime suspect. The policemen strive to show Katurian that he is mistaken, that artistic expression (at least Katurian’s artistic expression) does not occur in a vacuum. The short stories have real world violent consequences. However the policemen almost paradoxically try to establish the reality of Katurian’s stories by blurring the line between the reality of their interrogation and a performance staged for Katurian’s benefit. From Ariel’s staging of a fake torture of Michal to Tupolski’s almost perpetual “mucking around” the policemen try to get Katurian to accept the real world impact of his stories by absorbing him into a fiction of their own making. Consider the relationship between art and life outlined in McDonagh’s play.

Some of the questions you may wish to consider include:

Is there ultimately any difference between how the policeman view the barrier between art and life and how Katurian views it?

Do such views remain consistent over the course of the play or do they change?

Does the play offer a different view of this than any of the characters?

How do the stories that are performed for the audience impact your perception of the characters and the play?

Does Katurian bear any responsibility for Michal’s actions?

If Katurian is right, and there is a firm barrier between art and the real world why is it so important to him that his stories survive, and what might this suggest about both art and life?