In dynamiting Cortlandt Homes, Howard Roark breaks the law. What is his moral and philosophical argument for the rectitude of his action? in Book: The Fountain Head

Choose from one of the following three topics and write an essay.

1) At the end of part 2, Ellsworth Toohey confronts Howard Roark and says, “Mr. Roark, we’re alone here. Why don’t you tell me what you think of me?” To which Roark replies, “But I don’t think of you.” Explain how this brief exchange relates to the novel’s theme.

2) Gail Wynand is a brilliant individual who rose out of the slums by means of his own talent and effort. But despite his reverence for man’s noblest achievements, his newspaper,

The Banner, presents the most lurid and loathsome values. Why does Wynand pander in this manner?

3) In dynamiting Cortlandt Homes, Howard Roark breaks the law. What is his moral and philosophical argument for the rectitude of his action?