Describe the monologue and explain What are some insights that you have about decisions you made in your character work in light of the article by Phyllis Richmond?

PLEASE DONT USE A WRITER FROM VANCOUVER FOR THIS.

self analysis of how I feel I did in my choices used for the monologue 4000 miles and a revolution by Amy H. included. Also included are the questions used to write the self assessment paper. and the article that should be used to generate the topics of the paragraphs for the paper. basically how I understood the paper and then use the concepts she write about in creating my paper….i.e. character and actor are two separate entities yet the actor controls both, however you can become the character and allow for the choices the character may make to come through. Watching which are actually choices for the character and which are the habits the actor has just allowed to come into the performance and which habits happened unconsciously.

the questions:

his assignment has several segments and requires videotaping. Make sure you complete each step.

(You may choose to do this assignment with another person who has Alexander Technique in the same weeks that you do.)

Read the attached article “The actor’s consciousness and the character’s consciousness” by Phyllis Richmond.

1-3 are done I will not be able to load the video, but you have the script used and my habits are, I forgot to free up the neck and allowed a collapsed neck, (hunchback like) vs I according to alexander technique should have allowed for more freedom and no tensing and allowed the muscles in the neck to extend, this hindered my overall ability to project and sound clear, brought my energy on film down.

I also made the choice to stage this filming in my car as though a passenger was hearing me speak.

also made the choice to smoke to tell the story…. maybe bad considering its about a cross country biking trip though maybe i started smoking after (in the monologue) my best friend was tragically lost.

Also was an alive shot from inside the car so thing were going on around me, however maybe it took away the focus from me as a half of the 2 min monologue is mostly profile. Unique though because it was very real life.

could have extended the pass in the part when I say” the trucked came off the truck nd….took him off the road”.

Also needed more climax and climb and it was more like the bike trip, performance wise…. FLAT.

1) Choose a monologue / or a scene if you are working with a partner.

2) Prepare for the monologue/ or scene if you are working with a partner.

Warm up. Rehearse the monologue/ or a scene as you consider the work we have been doing in Alexander sessions.

3) Videotape yourself.

Write-up:

1) Describe the monologue and provide some context for it.

2) Describe your preparation.

3) Analyze the video clip in writing as you pay particular attention to the principles we have been working on in our sessions. Make sure to respond to each of the following questions:

a) What are some character choices that you have made? Did they work well?

b) What are some of your own habits that you recognize? Do they enhance the piece or hinder it?

c) Are there some new choices and ideas that you have after viewing the clip?

d) What are some insights that you have about decisions you made in your character work in light of the article by Phyllis Richmond?

If you work with a partner, each of you will reflect individually on the work on the scene.

4) Bring the video clip and your initial thoughts of the write-up to your Alexander session for an oral discussion of your analysis.

Email your video clip and the analysis by the due date.

attached the article for review.

Monologue:

So we were in Kansas, and it’s morning and the sun’s pretty low; between the low sun and the flat ride and the good wind it’s the perfect time to take shadow pictures. That means you take a picture of your own shadow while you’re riding, totally a staple of the cross country bike trip, gotta have the shadow picture, and with our huge packs we were gonna have especially dope shadow pictures. Micah thinks he’s a really good photographer, he thinks he has talent, so he’s doing a lot of bullshit with shutter speed and framing and what have you and we’re both taking shadow pictures and we hear a truck coming behind us, or I hear it, I assume Micah does, I think he does because we both hug the shoulder a little bit, still taking our shadow shots, and

the truck gets louder and closer and passes us and I see it’s a Tyson truck full of fucking crates of screaming chickens packed together and there are feathers flying out of the truck bed like some kind of I don’t know what kind of metaphor, and I scream up to Micah who did I mention was in front of me, look at that fucking slave poultry! And he looks back at me, and he’s laughing and he starts to say something but the truck bed separates from the cab and flies backward and takes him off the road. (Silence, save for city sounds.) Before the ambulance came this PR lady from Tyson came. I didn’t realize I was still holding my camera. She was like, “I’m sorry, sir, but I have to confiscate your camera.” She has to yell it for me to hear her over all these maimed and freaked-out birds. I was like, “My best friend is under three thousand chickens.” She was like, “I understand you’re upset, but this will be easier for both of us if you just give me your camera now.” I was like, “I couldn’t get to him, he’s buried under there, where is the fucking ambulance?” And she was like, “I’m going to ask you one more time—” and I threw my cam- era on the ground. (Silence.) So what I don’t have is these pictures from Wyoming, we did these stupid corny timer shots at the top of the Continental Divide, in front of the sign that says the alti- tude and all that shit, there was still snow up there in June. He caught a fish in Yellowstone, with his bare hands, he stood really still and reached in and . . . I had a picture of him holding up this fish longer than his head and neck. Oh and we dipped our back tires in the Pacific, that’s another corny thing you do, because then you’re supposed to dip your front tires in the Atlantic when you get there. Which I have not done yet,

incidentally, don’t know why. And I got a little video of him dipping his back tire and pretending to fall off this rock into the sea because he was a fucking clown, you know, he was a gifted physical comedian, he could have done that for real. And then there are all the pictures of him I don’t remember taking, and maybe losing those is worse than losing the ones I do. (Silence.) It took them about forty-five minutes to get him out, and the funny thing was he hadn’t sustained any trauma to his head or anything but he had been face down in the mud with hundreds of pounds of weight on him and he had suffocated. (Silence.) So the part that everyone’s pissed at me about is that af- ter I filled out all the paperwork at the police station and called his mom and my mom I got back on my bike and kept riding.